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Best babywearing blogger in Canada 2019

Congratulations to Raising a little who is the Winner for Best babywearing blogger for 2019. Read their nomination below.

Raising a Little

  • Lindsay has been great. I find her knowledgeable and helpful! I really enjoy her live talks and always feel so supported. It takes a village to raise a child and Lindsay you are such an important part of that village.
  • Lindsay is also always available with her expertise in carseat safety. I also appreciate how she supports local/canadian businesses, and is there to help in any way she can. She went above and beyond to help a family of quadruplets get some of the necessities, including the baby carrier. It made such a difference.
  • Lindsay is an amazing person. So personable and truely cares about other people, parents, children and their wellbeing. She is so easy to talk to and has so much knowledge. Lindsay has grown her business so much over the past year because of how honest she is.

Raising a Little’s website

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Other nominees

Fashionably Frum Motherhood

  • Avie is a really interesting blogger, she posts regularly and offers down to earth videos that are really easy to follow. She subtitles a lot of them, making is easy to catch up on them when the baby is sleeping because it won’t wake him up.
  • Avie doesn’t just do babywearing! Like her article on travelling with babies and toddlers, or sharing more personal stories like her experience with her own c-section.

Fashionable Frum Motherhood’s website.

Best Canadian babywearing store 2019

Congratulations to Carry me mommy, the Winner of Best Canadian babywearing store for 2019.  

Carry me mommy

Owner: Jessica
Carry me mommy shop
Carry me mommy Facebook page.
Instagram @CarryMeMommy

  • Jessica makes babywearing as easy and accessible as possible, having carriers for all shapes and sizes of people at every budget. She is always available to answer questions whether it is about purchasing a new carrier or learning how to use one you bought elsewhere.
  • Love this little piece of baby heaven!! Went in today and found my baby the cutest rainbow LennyLamb fleece for winter and the cutest boots to match! Absolutely adore the owner and appreciate her honesty and the care and attention she shows you.
  • Jessica was really quick. I ordered online and got my items right away. I wanted to add to my first order and change things around. I was able to do so without any issues. Great customer service and excellent products!
  • I have bought things from Carry me mommy several times. Jessica is extremely patient and knowledgeable and has so many incredible products. I always felt intimidated by wraps but today she made it simple by taking the time to teach me a few basics to get me started. I highly recommend going for a visit!  I love supporting local and am so glad we have such a great place right here in GP.

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Nominee for 2019

Birdie’s Room

Owner: Barb
Birdie’s Room shop
Birdie’s Room on Facebook. Chit chat facebook group.
Instagram @BirdiesRoom

  • Barb is awesome and very supportive. Birdie’s Room is my preferred babywearing store because it is accessible, and has helped with supporting meetings in PEI and in Ontario.
  • I love Cindy, she hosts in person hikes and meet-ups in the summer  in the Toronto area.
  • Their facebook chatter group is a really fun space. It’s a lively, small community with members from all over the world. We get to talk and share our experiences and the support in there is phenomenal. Plus we get to geek out over our favourite carriers, including guessing what Didy may be planning next.
  • Barb built our group lending library, gives us with space for our babywearing group meetings, offers local discounts, lets people borrow before they buy. There is no end to the support she provides to the local babywearing community. She’s not only an excellent business owner, but an excellent person, inside and out.

Best Canadian babywearing group 2019

Congratulations to the Grand Prairie Lending Library, the winner of the best babywearing library for 2019. Scroll down to read their nomination.

Grand Prairie Babywearing Lending Library

  • This is where I first learned to wear my baby. The group hosts meet ups, teaches proper carrier use, provides a community for new parents to meet other new parents, and also allows parents to borrow carriers. The library is really nice because it is so accessible.
  • The lending library is awesome because you can try out a lot of carriers to find the perfect one to suit you and baby before you splash the cash! Teresa, a facilitator, is super knowledgeable about so many carriers and how to use them with different sized babies and children.
  • I love the GP lending library because it’s a super friendly and supportive place to meet other moms and swap stories and tips! I have enjoyed all the library play dates.
  • My sister and I had Jessica come over to give us a private lesson on a few of the carriers. She was punctual and professional- not to mention patient, as our babies decided they needed to eat every ten minutes! She knew all of the wraps and carriers very well and had a lot of tips to share that we may not have learned from the instructions.

Grand Prairie Lending Library Facebook page.

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Read our other nominations for 2019.

Regina Babywearing

  • Regina Babywearing is a supportive and fun group. They were really helpful, and are one of the biggest groups in Saskatchewan and a good one to be a part of. I have made friendships from this group.
  • This group is great! They always answer questions to new members and share tips and tricks that make babywearing easier. The admins are active and have a wealth of experience to offer. They have helped to start and support many babywearing journies.
  • Regina Babywearing have an active lending library and work hard to support local businesses. This is important because they help with ensuring that babywearing is accessible for all parents, and supporting all members of the community.

Regina Babywearing facebook group

Carry me close

  • I will admit that I received the most help from CMC 3 years ago when I started babywearing. They are one of the longest running groups in Canada and have such a wealth of experience.
  • I like Carry me close because it is a great group. It was where I first learned how to babywear myself. In Toronto, it is much easier to take public transportation because navigating the city and finding parking can be such a pain. The first meetings I attended were inaccessible by stroller motivating me to really learn babywearing. Taking a stroller is so impractical.
  • They hold meetings regularly, serve a large population and really aim to be inclusive. It is all volunteer run, and the meeting I went to in the east end was really well run. The eduators are fabulous, and I first went to learn how to use my ring sling. It got me hooked into babywearing when a very nice and approachable eduator taught me how to use a ring sling properly.
  • I like the chatter group. I learned a lot about babywearing myths and what really was important to look out for to babywear properly.

Sanity through babywearing & cross country skiing

I have very fond memories of getting out to do winter activities with my dad when I was little – all sorts of things like skating, skiing, sledding, building snowmen, to name a few. These memories are so precious to me, that I wanted to do the same with my kids.  However, as I learned when I became a mother with a nine to five job, weekends quickly fill up with swimming lessons,  gymnastics and other commitments, I found it challenging to find the time to get out and actually enjoy the winter months.

But life really changed once my second baby was born. My first child, unlike my second child was extremely colicky and fussy for the first year of his life and the only thing that calmed him down was taking him out for long walks, which was easy since he was a summer baby. Babywearing was a lifesaver. It quickly became an important part of our lives, and I soon realized that getting out for walks together was calming for both of us, and helped me shed the baby weight much sooner than anticipated.

When winter rolled around, getting out for walks was much harder because many of the sidewalks in my neighbourhood were not plowed. When I expressed these difficulties to my family doctor, he had some really great suggestions. My doctor is a huge advocate of getting children outside as much as possible, no matter what season is. He made reference to Sweden, where it is the norm to bundle up your babies, as early as the day they are born, and get them outside for their naps. He pointed me towards some additional information on this Swedish model on outdoor napping, that I found interesting:

In Sweden and other Scandinavian countries, outdoor napping is recommended by doctors and is common both at home and at state-run daycares. Research by Marjo Tourula, from the University of Oulu in Finland, has shown that napping outdoors in frigid temperatures improves quality of sleep and increases duration of sleep in babies and toddlers. Many Scandinavian parents believe that the fresh air helps children eat better, be more active and promotes better health by reducing coughs and colds. The sounds and smells of nature are also quite soothing and may boost brain development. It’s often quite common to see sleeping babies in the cold weather, all bundled up in strollers outside coffee shops.1

My family doctor is also a huge advocate of exposing children to all sorts of different outdoor activities from a young age and he went on to tell me some stories about when his daughters were young.  He explained that he had taken both of his kids out cross country skiing when they were little and would strap the youngest to his back. Knowing that I had been an avid skier for most of my life, and that I was also big into babywearing, he suggested going out on the trails while carrying my youngest baby on my back.

So I decided one day to try it out.

I am so glad I did — my 6 month old LOVED it!

The first time I tried cross country skiing with my baby, I anticipated being out for about 20 minutes, as I was unsure how this would all work. Well that plan quickly changed as my baby immediately got comfortable up on my back in the carrier and dozed off. And meanwhile, I was having such a great time that we ended up  staying out for an hour. I ended up going back out two more times that week because we both loved it so much! I would stay out for about an hour each session, however would keep going if baby was still napping at the end of the hour.

My baby’s favourite thing was looking over my shoulder, and with the motion and fresh air, he quickly fell asleep. And for me, I find it so incredibly calming to be outside in the middle of winter and magical when you are lucky enough to get out when it’s snowing! It’s also a chance for me to get some peace and quiet during the day. If my baby was is being a bit fussy (teething, tired, gassy, etc), usually a trip outside calms him down right away, and I can relax and not have to focus on soothing him or calming him down as nature does that for me.

Getting out cross country skiing is great exercise. When I first started skiing with my son, I forgot how many muscles were involved, and quickly realized that it truly was a full body workout. AND remember, you have that added weight on your back, so it really challenges you!

I was so excited about this new activity, that I perhaps overdid it a bit in the first week and did not listen to my body like I should have. My advice would be to start a bit more slowly, and try it 1-2 times in the first week and then see how your body is feeling. I was so sore after that first time that I ended up needing to take the next week off to rest. But the following week I got right back into it.  It took me about a month to build up enough strength to make it more effortless. One of the great things about having a baby, is that they are constantly growing and getting bigger. So even when my body got used to using all the muscles involved in cross country skiing, the weight of an ever growing baby added a constant challenge, so it was never truly effortless. It was the perfect way to challenge me.

Another thing I loved about being able to take my son cross country skiing was that it is an activity that we do together, just the two of us. I grew up skiing, both cross country and downhill and am so comfortable being on skis, it’s like second nature to me. Since I never considered attempting something like this with my first son (mostly since I was not into babywearing the first time around), this will be a wonderful memory of something special that I did together just with my second son. We also got to see also sorts of cool wildlife. We saw bunnies, foxes and even a few deer!

I am so glad that I got into babywearing (especially back carrying), because it really opened up a lot of opportunities that I might not have attempted otherwise!

Want to hear some pieces of advice I wish I’d gotten? Go with someone.

The winter I spent on maternity leave was pretty mild so the cold wasn’t a major concern, but one time, my son lost his mitt and I only noticed this after taking him off my back when I got back to the car. If you’re just starting out, it might be useful to go together with someone else so you can help each other get your babies up on your back (as it can be challenging with carriers and snowsuits). This way, you can also spot check each other’s babies for lost mitts, hats, etc.

Later that season, once I was comfortable and had built up enough confidence skiing with my baby on my back, I decided to be a little more adventurous and take both kids out with me one weekend. My 3 year old had never been cross country skiing before, but I decided it would be fun to get him out to try it. What I did not anticipate was how often a 3 year old would fall over on his skis, and how challenging it would be trying to pick him up while carrying a baby on your back on your own skis! Many lovely strangers ended up coming over to help my 3 year old get up. But needless to say, that skiing session did not last long. Although the skiing that day was a bit of a failure, we still made the best of it as there was ice fishing nearby which my three year old was absolutely fascinated by. The next time I attempted cross country skiing with both kids, we ended up going as a whole family so that my husband could help our 3 year old.

Another piece of advice? Rent the gear.

I found it was easier than trying to get all the gear into your car and get out to the trails, and there are so many places you can rent your gear from, really simplifying getting out. I live near Gatineau park, and our Gatineau Plus cards offers free 1 hour cross country ski rentals at a few locations (we went to Lac Leamy near the Casino du Lac Leamy). And many times during the work week, there were so few people there that you could often take the skis for longer than an hour.

Since starting this activity with my youngest child, it has become a fun family activity. We even meet up with some friends and their families sometimes and get everyone out to enjoy the winter together. In the spring, we sometimes opt for snowshoe rentals instead, and bring along a bag of seeds and go out and feed the chickadees along the trail, which the kids absolutely love. This love of skiing and the outdoors has also paved the road into a trying out downhill skiing with my oldest. Last year, he was old enough to put him into downhill skiing lessons at Camp Fortune. I was amazed at how quickly he picked it up and within a month, we were able to take the chair lift up and ski together down the beginner hills, and eventually the intermediate hills by the end of the season. Much like cross country skiing was a special activity that I shared with my youngest, I am finding that downhill skiing is a special activity that I love spending together, just the two of us, with my oldest. I have also inspired others to get their children into skiing this winter, and will likely be joining up with some friends and family to go downhill skiing this winter.

I truly feel like this first step of getting out cross country skiing with my youngest has reignited my love of being outdoors in the winter. I have also realized that, especially with children, you really have to embrace the winter months and get out there. We have a small sledding hill across the street from us which I love taking the kids to every weekend, and love seeing their thrilled little faces, big smiles, laughter and happy screams of glee as they “rush” down the hill with all the other neighbourhood kids.  I am really hoping that I am helping my children create wonderful winter memories and helping to create a new generation that loves experiencing our beautiful Canadian winters.

 

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Footnotes
1. Read the research by Marjo Tourula here.

Calgary 2019 – Call for volunteer speakers

I am really excited to be taking our conference on the road after a few years break. And heading to Calgary!!! This year’s conference theme is Attachment and Community.

Join us as a volunteer speaker for this event. Speakers would get full access to both days of the event, one $10 discount code on an entry ticket to gift to family or friends, and receive a lunch each day they work. I also offer mentoring for volunteer presenter. Each presenter will be required to attend a practice session and I will book a run through with each person before the conference starts.

Apply today! Tell us about yourself, what you’d like to teach, and presentation type. We are looking for presentations on carrying, babywearing, parenting, and more. If you have any questions, please talk to us and send us a note. Presenters do not need to be certified, however, I do prefer a minimum of 2 years of experience for all presenters conducting hands-on workshops. Need ideas on what to submit? Take a look at our previous agendas: 2016 and 2015.

Partners for this conference include Babywearing Calgary, Babes in Arms and Raising a Little.

We have three rooms this year, one will be exclusively for workshops.

Summer Babywearing Tips

Summer is here, heat warnings are on the horizon, or maybe already on your weather forecast for today. You have a hot sticky situation and a baby to carry, or even a toddler who just WON’T stop treating you as their favourite climbing gymn, what is a parent supposed to do?

How can you stay cool in the hot summer months while wearing your baby or toddler?

There are somethings you can do that will make a difference, but you need to keep things in perspective. Your hot body, squashed up against the little heat sinks that are our children, well, there’s only so much relief you can expect. A baby, quite simply cannot adjust as well to the summer heat — they sweat less AND they generate more heat when they move.1 Normally, a mom’s body can act to thermoregulate your infant’s temperature if they are worn while touching your chest. You will sweat more as a result, but the reality is there’s only so much that you can do and that your body can do. Warm is warm and hot is hot. A thing also to watch out for is that a man’s body will overheat more easily than a woman’s.

And let’s be honest. There are adjustments we can make to keep cooler and comfortable while babywearing. But there are limits, when you babywear in hot weather, you must accept facts. Not a lot of carriers that will truly leave you feeling cool and breezy while carrying a child.

So I will tackle both carrying solutions and other options to stay as cool as possible.

What carriers can help?

The general rule of thumb is to use something that:

  • Is thinner.
  • Brings the sweat easier to the surface to promote wicking and evaporation.
  • Contains a venting panel.
  • Avoids using darker coloured fabric.

The style of carrier you use also has an impact. Let’s take a look!

Ring slings

These carriers are already relatively thin. They only require layer of fabric around a baby’s body, and even the thickest are made with natural fabrics. The thinner the fabric, the more able it is to capture the sweat, bring it to the surface so that it can dry in the heat of the day. They are a medium hard carrier to master and are great for quick ups and downs, transitioning to sleep and for exploring. There are even versions which are made of mesh or a swimsuit material to enable you to go wading without worrying about bleach damage from local park pool water. You can also use the tail of the sling as a head cover to protect your little one from the sun. Just remember to keep their face clear and in view!

The disadvantage, no matter which type you use is that they are an asymmetrical carrier. The weight is on one side of the body and pulls on a diagonal making ring slings a short term carrier for most parents. Short term carrying is usually defined as an hour or less.

Soft structured carriers, buckle carriers, mei tais / meh dais and onbuhimos

I am grouping these all together because they all use some sort of panel that holds the baby against the parent’s body. These carriers are automatically cooler than some other styles. They tend to have open sides, which allows for more airflow than a tightly wrapped child.

However, some brands can be made from thick canvas or synthetic materials which aren’t breathable. Choose one made with natural fibres that allow for “breathability,” such as a wrap conversion or a carrier made with natural cotton, linen or blend which automatically allows for more airflow and for the heat to dissipate from the body. Another thing is that many of these carriers also come in a summer version and have a cool weave mesh panel that allows the sweat to wick off your baby’s back. Some brands even have an all-seasons options, like the Lillebaby, with a panel that can be modified, allowing you to unzip it or remove it for summertime.

These carrier styles are among some of the easiest to master, but may not be suitable for every body type. Particularly the ones which are full-buckle.

Wraps

If you love wrapping, you’ll want to look for a wrap that is thin enough to be supportive, yet allows the sweat to come to the surface and dry off faster. If your child is small enough, a gauze wrap could do the trick. You might also consider trying different fabric blends like linen or hemp. But don’t always rely on the fibre content listed on the label: Do your research, as some of these wraps can be quite thick! So much so that a thin wool blend wrap can be a good option too, when compared to a very thick wrap.

When wrapping, I would also consider using different tying techniques. A carry with three passes (this is when the carrier is wrapped around the body three times) is too warm for a hot day. Consider trying out new wrapping techniques that rely on fewer passes. A supported ruck is always a favourite of mine on those sticky days.

We feel heat differently on different parts of our bodies, so use summer as a reason to switch things up. Change positions if you’re out for the day and find you’re getting too hot, or bring your partner along so you can take turns carrying.

Wraps have the highest learning curve, but also the greatest amount of adaptibility.

Staying safe in the heat!

Best time to take your littles outside?

It is not recommended to use sunscreen on babies under 6 months of age. Thankfully, the easiest way to avoid sunburn is prevention.

The sun is strongest between 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.2 One option is to limit your activities during peak hours, but this isn’t always a realistic option. Getting out of the house and enjoying what the community has to offer is part of what makes summer great. And it’s bigger than that, as parents know, baby doesn’t always accommodate leaving the house on a predetermined schedule – somedays it’s a get out when you can! Moreover, there’s nothing worse for baby blues or postpartum depression than feeling trapped and stuck inside your home. Getting out of the house, no matter the weather, can be one of the best things to help you enjoy your maternity or parental leave.

Thankfully, there are many things we can do to protect us during peak sun hours, go out and have fun.

What to wear?

I would recommend wide brimmed hats for both you and your little one. However, if you’re wearing baby on your back, check that the brim of your hat isn’t hitting your child in the face. Especially if you like to wear high on the back with a wrap or an onbuhimo.

If you have a baby who hates wearing hats, or just manages to get out of all of them, consider using a parasol. There’s nothing like a golf umbrella to provide you with a portable shade blanket as you enjoy a summer festival or garage sale.

Finally, take a good look at what both you and your child are wearing to head outside. Most carriers will provide coverage of the baby’s torso, so many of us use one piece baby suits or just take kids outside in their onesies. Which leaves only their legs and feet exposed. Consider using baby legs. Choose fibres that allow for the sweat to be wicked away on both your bodies.

How to cool down?

Generally

  • Place a cloth between you and your baby, it catches the sweat and is much more easily replaced and is more practical than constantly changing clothes.
  • Stop often to nurse or bottle feed your baby, smaller more frequent feedings are highly recommended. Hydration is important.
  • Get a portable personal fan, provided your arms are long enough to keep it out of baby’s reach while using it (backwearing rocks with this one).
  • Drinks plenty of fluids yourself, smaller more frequent quantities are best. Especially breastfeeding moms, you’re hydrating for two!

At home

  • Keep your window shades down and curtains closed to reduce the heating effect of the sun.
  • If you have air-conditioning, keep it no cooler than 24-26 degrees Celsius. This prevents the baby from going from one temperature extreme to another and helps with their thermoregulation.
  • Use fans to help circulate the air. For those with air-conditioning, a fan also reduces your electricity use and can save you quite a bit of money. If you have a toddler, keep them out of reach.
  • For those without air conditioning, keep the windows open.

Out of the house

  • Stick to walking in shady areas whenever possible, where there is a good breeze you can catch. A nice patio, a large beach parasol, a shady forest walk, or shady side of the street are all great options.
  • Goto air-conditioned places! Visit shops, go grocery shopping, malls and catch up on your chores.
  • Consider joining a walking group at your local mall. Even if they aren’t specifically for parents, it’s always nicer to walk with someone else and you can meet some of your neighbours that way.
  • Use a wide-brimmed hat or a parasol.

Warning for stroller use…

Putting your child into the stroller may be a great way to give each of you a chance to cool down, but please remember, placing a cloth over top of the stroller cuts air circulation and creates a heat sink. Temperatures can rise quickly to 30 degrees Celsius as is shown be experiments conducted in Sweden.3

Things to remember

  • Keep track of your baby’s diapers. A baby is well hydrated if they have six to eight wet diapers over a 24 hours period.
  • The pee should be a pale yellow. If it’s dark, increase their water or fluid intake.
  • If you are breastfeeding your baby, make sure you drink plenty of water.
  • Water is best for keeping babies and toddlers well hydrated. Fruit juices, cocktails and pop are to be avoided.

And most importantly of all, enjoy summer!

 

I would like to extend a big thank you to all the families who provided me with their babywearing pictures.

  • Jacqueline Bradley, PEI. Jacqueline is an admin for the PEI Babywearing and attachment parenting facebook group.
  • Audrey La Duchesse Gingras, QC and ON.
  • Kendra Runions, ON. Kendra supports parents with feeding at Full Circle Feeding in Carleton Place, ON.
  • Amélie Longpré, QC. Amélie is an instructor from Drummondville QC and you can reach her here.
  • Ashley Saskiw, AB.
  • Lindsay Browns, AB.
  • Avril Blaine, BC.

 

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Footnotes
1. This webpage by the state of New South Wales in Australia is one of the most comprehensive out there on how to take care of yourself in the heat.
2. Caring for kids is the web portal for information to parents from the Canadian Pediatrics Society. They recommend staying in from 10:00 am until 2:00 pm. Read more of what they suggest here.
3. Read more about this experiment here.

Benefits of cycling for families

Getting out of the house and being able to do things can be so important after having a baby, even though some days it feels like it might be almost mission impossible.

Being stuck at home all day with a baby sucks, and if you’ve had a rough birth, if you’re really tired and sore, things can be even tougher. Because the longer you’re alone, the louder the crying and fussing may seem and the more you start to doubt yourself as a parent. Most parents handle maternity and parent leave alone, and the more you are alone, the more isolated you feel, the bigger and harder things will seem. Postpartum depression (PPD) is a real concern, with 1 out of every 6 women and 1 out of every 10 men suffering from it in Canada. Any little thing we can do to make this period easier helps.1

Researchers at the University of Birmingham examined data from 13 studies and determined that exercise is often a great low impact way to prevent or reduce these feelings of depression. I love this quote from the Royal College of Psychiatrists in the UK:

“We often talk about the mind and body as though they are completely separate – but they aren’t. The mind can’t function unless your body is working properly – but it also works the other way. The state of your mind affects your body.”2

The reason I love cycling so much is because it can be adapted to any lifestyle, and you don’t need to be really good at it either, you can move faster than walking and go further distances with little trouble.

  • Not got the energy to do a long trip? Take a 15 minute ride to the store to pick up what you need.
  • Have to take your kids to school? Pop yourself and the kidlets on the bicycle and get them there.
  • Prefer cycling just on the weekends – what I call a Sunday bike rider?

I think cycling is a great way to get out of the house with a baby and young kids because it can be used just like walking – as you need it

Families who engage in what is known as “enriching activities” which includes outdoor activities experience diminished symptoms of PPD.3 Something you can do with the whole family is even better.4

Families that do things together, including exercise are happier. It is too easy to feel trapped by your obligations and the never ending list of things that absolutely need to be done. With a bike, taking the trip down to the local store can be an easy solution and much faster than loading up the car. By breaking up the chores into smaller ones especially outside of the winter season can make life so much better.5 Not only are you living by example, but everyone gets a nice little boost from doing it as well.

And we have such a fantastic network of biking trails through our city parks, alongside river paths and more. The Canada Trails website has a fantastic map and a resource list for each province. Pack a picnic basket, and just go. There’s nothing more lovely.

This is the third article in our cycling series. The first article called Cycling and babywearing – yes or no? In it, we discuss whether to babywearg on a bike and also includes extensive information on laws in Canada. The second article, called But what about Europe – babywearing and cycling abroad, acknowledges that other cultures do wear while cycling and also includes extensive quotes from my European babywearing colleagues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Footnotes
1. This is an indepth report for Public Health Ontario on Perinatal Depression by Cindy-Lee Dennis, a professor at the University of Toronto.

For more information on Canadian resources visit Postpartum.org. Though they are located in BC, the have lists of Canadian resources.

2. Researchers from the University of Birmingham examined data from 13 trials including 1,734 women. Their study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, concludes that exercise – either in group sessions, individually or when added to other interventions – is effective in reducing postpartum depressive symptoms. More information can be found in this article published in the Telegraph August 29, 2017. The authors wrote: “UK clinical guidance recommends psychological therapy and antidepressants for postnatal depression. However, women can be reluctant to take antidepressants postnatally and the availability of psychological therapies is often limited.

“Given the high prevalence of postpartum depression and the potential for exercise to be a low-cost, freely available intervention, aerobic exercise should be considered as a management option for postpartum women with depressive symptoms and as a potential preventative measure more generally in postpartum women.”

Here is a link to another study which shows exercise has some impact on PPD.

3. Other ways to reduce PPD are listed on slide number 9 and cite information from studies by Zajicek -Farber 2009 and Cadzow et all 1999.

4. Cycling rules and why you shouldn’t cycle and babywear.

5. This article from the Royal College of psychiatrists in Britain talks about the benefits of exercise for those who suffer from depression.

Article on family exercise with CNN.

Information on children’s mental health by the Centre of Disease Control in the United States.

BWICAward Prizes 2018

Thank you to everyone who voted this year during the BWIC Awards. Prizes are being mailed out this week, I thank everyone for their patience.

Donations were provided by Jenya from Veddma Creations, links to similar products will be provided below or you can visit her shop here.

Opalite Tree of life pendant Malachite Tree of life pendant
Link to similar item in store Link to similar item in the store
Green Glass opalescent Tree of life pendant Seven chakras pendant with Swarovski crystals
Link to similar items in store Link to similar items in store

In each kit, winners also receive a wrap scrap from West of the 4th wraps. It is called Canadian Tribute and was the custom wrap for the 2016 conference.

  

BWICWeek 2018 Prizes

I received some great prizes for both the BWICweek this year.

Congratulations to Lindsey Sanderson and Geneviève Calvé. You have each won a sling conversion from Little Love.

You each get to chose the rings you’d prefer. Please contact Little Luv through their facebook page to arrange the final details.

 

Winner: Geneviève Calvé
Little Luv Sling Conversion: Geckos
With Chewellery
 

 

 

Winner: Lindsay Sanderson
Little Luv Sling Conversion: Wooly Snowflakes
With Chewellery
 

 

Coming soon – ring sling giveaway from Little Luv to celebrate Canada Day.